AMERICAN
KANG DUK WON
KARATE

"PHILOSOPHIES FOR TRADITIONAL MARTIAL ARTS TRAINING"




PRESENTED BY MASTER FRANK A. PALUMBO, JR.
AMERICAN KANG DUK WON SENIOR DIRECTOR

1997 KARATE CAMP
JULY 10 - 13
SPIRIT ~ LOYALTY ~ VIRTUE




INTRODUCTION

The purpose of this class is to discuss the ideals and ethics upon which traditional martial arts training - like yours in American Kang Duk Won Karate - has been founded. From Bodhidharma to Funakoshi to the present, one can recognize profound parallels in the offerings of these ways of wisdom and practicality in every day living. The challenge, of course, is to maintain the discipline in our daily lives which will enable us to better understand and apply the lessons these philosophies ultimately offer.

As a member of American Kang Duk Won Karate, you are in line with the same martial spirit and philosophies which were detailed in the earliest documented systems of unarmed combat. It is essential that we understand the significance of our own place in the history of these disciplined art forms and their lifestyles.

Each of us has a moral and civic responsibility to reflect the teachings of American Kang Duk Won Karate in a positive and well tempered manner. At the end of a workout, our art should not be left in the training hall. It should be with us as we walk home, enter work, meet new people, accept our daily challenges, and even when we pause to appreciate the beauty of nature around us. When approached with an open mind, the way of karate can influence every aspect of a person's life.

We are not practicing a sport. The Art of American Kang Duk Won has been handed down through the years always expressing a careful consideration for spirit, loyalty, and virtue in all we do.

As martial artists today, we are similar to the legendary practitioner of the past. Each of us can make as much of our training as we allow ourselves to envision. The only limits one will experience in his traditional training in American Kang Duk Won Karate are those which are self-imposed. Therefore . . .

The possibilities of our successes and personal growth are without bounds!



PHILOSOPHERS, TEXTS, AND YOUR TRAINING

  1. "Spirit": Everyday Tao - Ming-Dao
  2. "Loyalty": Everyday Tao - Ming-Dao
  3. "Virtue": Everyday Tao - Ming-Dao
  4. Teachings of Bodhidharma
  5. Wisdom of Confucius
  6. Fulfillment in Taekwondo - S. K. Shim
  7. Five Rings - Musashi
  8. Karate-do - Funakoshi
  9. Hagakure: Samurai - Tsunetomo
  10. Zen in he Martial Arts - Hyams
  11. Zen in the Art of Archery - Herrigel
  12. The Martial Spirit - Kauz
  13. Karate Dojo: Traditions & Tales - Urban
  14. T'ai Chi Ch'uan & Meditation - Liu
  15. Zen Way To The Martial Arts - Taisen
  16. Kung Fu: History & Philosophy - Chow
  17. Tao Te Ching - Lao Tsu
  18. Ki In Daily Life - Tohei
  19. "Dedication"
    - Master Lawlor

The titles above are suggested references for an overview of various traditional martial arts philosophies. a wide range of cultures and styles are represented. However, with careful reading and thought, very common ideals become apparent.



The following selections were taken from a class presented to students at the 1997 four day AKDWK karate camp. The presentation was given by Master Palumbo.

  1. Ming-Dao: Shen "Spirit"

  2. Ming-Dao: Zhong "Loyalty"

  3. Ming-Dao: De "Virtue"

  4. Bodhidharma

  5. Confucuis

  6. Sang Kyu Shim

  7. Musashi

  8. Funakoshi

  9. Tsunetomo

  10. Hyams

  11. Herrigel

  12. Kauz

  13. Urban

  14. Liu

  15. Taisen

  16. Chow

  17. Lao Tsu

  18. Tohei

  19. Master Lawlor



GLOSSARY OF TERMS

BUSHIDO

DO

KANG DUK WON

KARATE-DO

KI

PHILOSOPHY

KUNG FU

SAMURAI

TAE KWON DO

T'AI CHI CH'UAN

TAO TE

TRADITION

ZEN



WORKS CITED

  1. Bodhidharma. The Teachings of Bodhidharma. Trans. Red Pine. New York: North Point Press, 1987.

  2. Chow, David, and Richard Spangler. Kung Fu: History, Philosophy, and Technique. California: Unique Publications, 1982.

  3. Confucius. The Wisdom of Confucius. Ed. Lin Yutang. New York: Modern Library, 1938.

  4. Funakoshi, Gichen. Karate-Do: My Way of Life. New York: Kodansha International, 1975.

  5. Herrigel, Eugen. Zen in the Art of Archery. New York: Vintage Books, 1953.

  6. Hyams, Joe. Zen in the Martial Arts. New York: Bantam Books, 1979.

  7. Kauz, Herman. The Martial Spirit: An Introduction to the Origin, Philosophy, and Psychology of the Martial Arts. Woodstock, New York: Overlook Press, 1988.

  8. Lawlor, Robert C. American Kang Duk Won: Basic Techniques and Principles. Watertown, New York: Panther Publications, 1995.

  9. Liu, Da. T'ai Chi Ch'uan and Meditation. New York: Schocken Books, 1986.

  10. Ming-Dao, Deng. Everyday Tao: Living With Balance and Harmony. San Francisco: Harper, 1996.

  11. Musashi, Miyamoto. A Book of Five Rings. Trans. Victor Harris. New York: Overlook Press, 1974.

  12. Shim, Sang Kyu. Promise and Fulfillment in the Art of Tae Kwon Do. Detroit: Sang Kyu Shim, 1974.

  13. Shim, Sang Kyu. Making of a Martial Artist. Detroit: Sang Kyu Shim, 1981.

  14. Taisen, Deshimaru. The Zen Way to the Martial Arts. New York: Dutton, Inc., 1982.

  15. Tohei, Koichi. Ki in Daily Life. Tokyo: Ki No Kenkyukai H.Q., 1980.

  16. Tsunetomo, Yamamoto. Hagakure: Book of The Samurai. Trans. William ScottWilson. New York: Avon Books, 1979.

  17. Urban, Peter. The Karate Dojo: The Traditions and Tales of a Martial Art. Vermont: Tuttle, Co., 1987.





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